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Rust is not fast
cananian

There are plenty of safe high-level languages in the world; JavaScript, for example. Rust is different: it's supposed to be safe and fast.

But Rust is slow. (And its type system hates you.)

Rust is slow because there is lots of hidden indirection ("smart dereferencing") and other hidden costs (ref counting, etc). In low-level C code I can look at a line of code and know roughly how many (slow) memory accesses are present. Not so in Rust.

Further, Rust's type system leads to extra unnecessary copying, just to get your code to compile without massive refactoring of the standard library. When writing rusty-turtle I found myself having to add ~ or @ pointers to my types (forcing extra layers of dereferencing) just to work around the type system. Further, the APIs have a genericity problem: there are lots of duplicate methods, since &-pointers aren't truely generic/orthogonal. (And you will find yourself duplicating methods in your own APIs as well, in order to be able to pass in parameters with different reference types -- or else just throw up your hands and wrap an extra @ layer around everything.)

The ownership type system also fights against typical APIs like find_and_insert for maps, since you don't know (before you do the find) whether or not you will be giving up ownership of the parameter (in order to do an insert). So you just copy the inserted value, always! Cycles are cheap, right?

Rust is also slow because it is not built to be parallel. The language is concurrent, but this is a word game: in the past few years the terms have been redefined such that "concurrent" is (roughly) non-blocking cooperative multitasking (such is implemented by node.js and GNU Pth), and "parallel" is reserved for actually doing more than one thing simultaneously (whether on separate CPUs or separate cores of a single CPU). Rust's memory model doesn't help: there is no shared memory, and ownership types make fork/join parallelism difficult. All inter-task communication is explicit message passing, with the races that entails. (Perhaps I'm spoiled: the Cilk work-stealing nano/microscheduler is my benchmark for speed.)

Some possible improvements:

  • Get rid of smart dereferencing; make it clear when performance is impacted by memory references.
  • Fix bugs with small objects/ABI limitations to avoid unnecessary parameter wrapping.
  • Make & pointers truely generic (or invent a new pointer which is) and do template expansion/method splitting to generate the proper specialized version of the method automatically (although this will exacerbate existing problems with code caching).
  • Better support fast refcounting/fast gc (update coalescing, generations).
  • Support fork/join parallelism and work-stealing.

This post is written from my experience with Rust in May 2013. Some of these problems are known, and some may eventually be fixed. But it makes me wonder what the language is really supposed to be good at. There are already plenty of slow safe languages.